Patient Education

What is Cardiac Electrophysiology?

Monomorphic+reentrant+VT+animationCardiac electrophysiology is a sub-specialty of cardiology which deals with the study of the heart’s electrical system. The term “electrophysiology study” or “EP study” applies to any procedure that requires the insertion of an electrode catheters into the heart to make electrical measurements. Electrode catheters are long, flexible wires that allow electrical measurements and stimulation of the heart muscle and its electrical system.

Electrophysiology studies may be done to diagnose electrical abnormalities (see Heart Rhythm Problems and Conditions), to access the heart for treatment or correction of certain conditions, such as Pacemaker Implantation, ICD Insertion, or Cardiac Ablation.

Read more about the Cardiac Electrophysiology

The Heart Electrical System

178633584 The heart electrical system causes the heart to beat and controls the heart rate (the number of beats per minute). It also has special pathways (conduction pathways) that carry the electrical signals throughout the lower heart chambers (ventricles) for each heartbeat. An irregularity in the heart’s electrical system is called an arrhythmia, or heart rhythm disorder. Rhythm disorders can cause the heart to beat too slowly (bradycardia) or too fast (tachyarrhythmia). Read more about the Heart Electrical System

Heart Rhythm Abnormalities

  • What is Arrhythmia
  • Symptoms of Arrhythmia
  • Types of Arrhythmia
  • Treatment Options for Heart Rhythm Abnormalities

Read more about Heart Rhythm Abnormalities

Diagnostic Methods

  • Electrocardiogram (ECG)
  • Exercise ECG or Stress Test
  • Holter Monitor (24-72 hour ECG)
  • Event Monitor
  • Mobile Continuous Outpatient Telemetry
  • Implantable Loop Recorder
  • Tilt Table Test
  • Electrophysiology (EP) Study

Read more about Diagnostic Methods

Frequently Asked Questions

Find answers to the frequently asked questions. For example:

Read more Frequently Asked Questions

Glossary

Definitions for heart related terms. Search Glossary Terms

Other Web Links

Web resources for the both the general public and for medical professionals. Read Other Web Links